Teaching Resources

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Browse teaching resources that explore the topics of our videos. All of these resources have been reviewed and approved by secondary science teachers.

Using your science to understand volcanic eruptions
Tuesday 11th Feb 2020, 09.00am

Using your science to understand volcanic eruptions

Volcanoes are present across the Earth, from the barren wastes of Antarctica to densely populated regions in Europe, Asia and the Americas, and are both spectacular and deadly. But what makes a volcano erupt, and how...
Through a simple experimental investigation, the resource encourages students to explore how formation temperature affects crystal size (KS3). Students are then directed to use their findings to explain the difference in crystal size between intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks, review bonding (KS4), and undertake calculations about pressure as applied to volcanic eruptions (KS4).
KS3 (UK) ages 11-15 - Crystal Size Investigation
KS4 (UK) ages 14-16 - Chemical Compounds in Magma
KS4 (UK) ages 14-16 - Pressure Calculations
Through a simple experimental investigation, the resource encourages students to explore how formation temperature affects crystal size. Students are then directed to use their findings to explain the difference in crystal size between intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks, review bonding (KS4), and undertake calculations about pressure as applied to volcanic eruptions (KS4).
This resource uses volcanic activity as a context for engaging students with questions about bonding and structure. Students are asked a range of questions on each of the types of bonding introduced at GCSE (ionic, simple covalent, giant covalent, and metallic) and so this resource is perhaps best suited to a review lesson.
Students will use equations and make calculations related to pressure and depth, pressure, force and area, and Boyle’s Law.
Using your science to reveal how much rain fell on the dinosaurs
Tuesday 11th Feb 2020, 09.00am

Using your science to reveal how much rain fell on the dinosaurs

During the Cretaceous period (145 to 66 million years ago), the world was very different! It was hotter, with more rainfall, and dinosaurs would have roamed the lush wetlands and forests that existed in the UK....

Using these resources - created in collaboration with University of Oxford scientists - students can explore how the science they learn at school can be applied to real life research questions. This set of resources focuses on the work of Ricky Sengupta, a palaeo-climatologist who investigates past rainfall patterns. In these lessons, students will explore the adaptations of plants and animals to their environment (KS2/ages 7-11), learn about isotopes and the structure of the atom (KS3/ages 11-14), and take a deeper dive into how isotopes can help us to explore our planet's past (KS5/ages 17-18).
KS2 (UK) ages 7-11 - Rainfall Now and Then
KS3 (UK) ages 11-14 - Heavy Water
KS5 (UK) ages 17-18 - Isotopes
In this lesson, students will follow Ricky, a researcher, to learn about how our planet’s climate has changed over time and explore the features that make plants and animals well-adapted to their environment.
In this lesson, students will learn about isotopes, subatomic particles and the structure of the atom, linking it to concepts of weight and density.
In this lesson, students will take an in-depth dive into the techniques used by researchers to make new discoveries and learn about how isotopes can tell us about the history of our planet’s climate.