Teaching Resources

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Browse teaching resources that explore the topics of our videos. All of these resources have been reviewed and approved by secondary science teachers.

Soluble Semiconductors - A Revolution In Printing in the 21st Century
Thursday 22nd Nov 2018, 09.00am

Soluble Semiconductors- A revolution in Printing for the 21st Century?

The digital age is built upon semiconductors. The crystalline semiconductors, such as silicon or germanium, lie behind modern electronics and computing. They are such essential materials because their conducting properties may be altered in useful ways by the deliberate, controlled introduction...

Researchers studying semiconductors are looking to create new semiconductors that could revolutionize our technology. In these resources, students learn about resistance and apply this knowledge to explore how semiconductors might work (KS3), recognise I-V graphs and calculate resistanc (KS4), consider error in measurements (KS5), and apply what they know to identify and analyse uses and limitations of semiconductors (KS5).
KS3 - What is resistance?
KS4 - Ohm’s law and Ohmic conductors
KS5 - Resistivity and error in measurement
KS5 - What is a Semiconductor?
Learning outcomes: 1 Describe resistance in an electrical circuit. Define an insulator and conductor and predict what a semiconductor is. 3. Understand the uses of semiconductors.
Learning Outcomes: 1. Recognise I-V graphs and the limitations of Ohm’s Law. 2. Apply Ohm’s law to calculate resistance of a component and circuit. 3. Identify and analyse uses and limitations of semiconductors.
Learning Outcomes: 1. Define resistivity and determine the equation of resistivity. 2. Identify systematic and random errors. 3. Assess the uncertainty of measurements.
Learning Outcomes: 1. Recognise I-V graphs and the limitations of Ohm’s Law. 2. Describe the difference between an Ohmic conductor and a semiconductor. 3. Identify and analyse uses and limitations of semiconductors.
Bacteria Safari: Forest on your Fingernail
Wednesday 17th Oct 2018, 09.00am

Bacteria Safari: The Forest on your Fingernail

What on Earth can tiny microorganisms tell us about the animal and plant life around us? Bacteria are tiny organisms that exist everywhere; including on us! Watch this animation...

Researchers at the University of Oxford are study how bacteria live together, interact or compete, and hope to test theories about how much larger species interact. In these resources, inspired by this research, students devise a method to test whether the microorganisms in probiotics make it to the stomach alive (KS3), looks at how antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria develop (KS4), research what drives competitions or cooperation in animals (KS4), and read a research paper to consider evidence around how the microbiome can effect mood (KS5).
KS3 - Beneficial Bacteria
KS4 - Alternative Antibiotics
KS4 - Cooperate or Compete
KS5 - Gut Feeling
Probiotics contain species of these bacteria but do they actually work to increase their population in our intestines? This activity is suitable for extending the more able students. They plan an investigation to collect evidence before evaluating how valid their data would be.
In this activity students use a model to understand how antibiotic resistant bacteria develop and then investigate a possible solution.
Some groups of organisms live in harmony, sharing and helping each other. Whilst others fight for their share of resources – what drives organisms to cooperate or compete?In this lesson students find out why the work of microbiologists at The University of Oxford is helping to answer this question. This lesson is best used after students have studied competition between organisms. The main activity can be carried out for homework.
In this activity students read an extract from a paper written by microbiologists and The University of Oxford to understand how bacteria can influence our thoughts and feelings – are they trying to manipulate their hosts for their own benefit or is this simply a side-effect?