Teaching Resources

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Browse teaching resources that explore the topics of our videos. All of these resources have been reviewed and approved by secondary science teachers.

Materials for nuclear fusion: how do you confine a sun to a box?
Friday 18th May 2018, 03.30pm

Materials for nuclear fusion: how do you confine a sun to a box?

We face an energy crisis, so the idea of a clean, potentially limitless supply of energy is deeply appealing. Nuclear fusion, the same source of energy that makes the sun shine, could provide the answer, but there are some big obstacles to overcome. 

Researchers at the University of Oxford are investigating how different materials are affected by exposure to radiation inside nuclear fusion reactors, with the hope of being able to design better materials that will be able to resist radiation's damaging effects. These resources take inspiration from their work, allowing students to: explore some of the current methods for generating electricity and explore the basic ideas of nuclear fusion (KS3), explore the energy contained within every day objects using the famous equation, E=mc2 (KS4), learn how radiation is measured, and what a half-life is (KS4), and undertake calculations to discover the potential energy generated from fusion power (KS5)
KS3 - Star Power
KS4 - Fission and Fusion
KS4 - Too Hot to Handle
KS5 - Fusion
In this lesson, students explore some of the current methods for generating electricity and explore the basic ideas of nuclear fusion.
In this lesson students explore the famous equation E=mc2 and work out the equivalent energy ‘stored’ in everyday objects. They also look at the basics of nuclear fission and fusion and how nuclear weapons use both of these.
This lesson looks at how we measure radioactivity and how to calculate the half-life of radioactive materials.
In this lesson students learn more about nuclear fusion and undertake calculations to discover the energy potential of the method, as well as the challenges.
What are Quantum Rainbows?
Thursday 5th Oct 2017, 09.00am

What are Quantum Rainbows

‘What are Quantum Rainbows?’ you ask? Watch our animation and follow a tale of an intrepid explorer below, as we try to find out.

In these resources, inspired by the QCUMbER project led by the University of Oxford, students explore how spectra are formed, and how spectroscopy can be used by researchers (KS3 and 5), how 'colour' can be used to encode more information than binary codes (KS4), and how analogue signals like sound can be converted into digital codes (KS4).
KS3 - How to read a rainbow
KS4 - Colour coded
KS4 - Let's get digital
KS5 - Spectroscopy
Students make their own spectroscope to explore spectra from different light sources, and learn about the ways that researchers use spectroscopy in a range of scientific applications.
In this resource, students learn how information can be converted into code, such as binary (using 1s and 0s), or how using colours instead of just 'on' and 'off' can allow you to encode more information with fewer 'bits'.
In this activity, students learn about how sound, analogue data, can be converted in to a digital code, and look at amplitude, frequency, etc.
In this activity, students explore emission spectra, calculate wavelength and energy, and learn about the different ways that spectroscopy can be used by researchers to do a range of things, from looking at the composition of distant starts, to developing more powerful ways to transmit data.